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Stories from the Frontlines
Stories from the Frontlines

Season 1, Episode 1 · 7 months ago

Call Them a Banana!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the very first episode of Stories from the Frontlines!

In this episode, you’ll hear from Alice Arena, a member of the Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station who is fighting a fracked gas compressor station in Weymouth, MA. Hear about the community facing this fossil fuel threat, why Alice was inspired to take action, and where this 7-year campaign stands today.

Check out FRRACS’ website at https://www.nocompressor.com/. You can also find the group on Facebook (Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station) and on Twitter (@FRRACS_MA).

You can contact Alice and FRRACS by sending an email to nocompressor@gmail.com.

Learn more about Community Action Works on our website: https://communityactionworks.org/.

We’re also on Facebook (Community Action Works), Twitter (@ComActionWorks), and Instagram (@ComActionWorks).

Hello and welcome to the very first episode of stories from the front lines, brought to you by community action works. At Community Action Works, we believe that environmental threats are big, but the power of well organized community groups is bigger. That's why we work side by side with everyday people to confront those who are polluting and harming the health of our communities. I'm they rate the Johnny, the Western Massachusetts community organizer with Community Action Works, and I'm Shane to Casper, the Vermont and New Hampshire State Director for Community Action Works. Each episode of this podcast will bring on new community member or activists to share their story of taking on environmental threats from the front lines. They'll share what worked and what didn't as they build their gass roots campaign, what they learned along the way and how they keep fighting, as our government officials are slow to act and corporate players are rarely held accountable. This season will be focusing on stories about our energy system, pipelines, power plants and other fossil fuel infrastructure and how these stories tie together in a bigger regional picture in the northeast. Without further ado, we are so excited to welcome our first guest today will be speaking to Alice arena, the leader of the for river residents against the compressor station, or fracts. She's leaving the charge against a compressor station in weymouth Massachusetts. Welcome Alice. Thank you, Shana. Thank you more very good to be here. So glad to have you, Alice. We love the listeners to hear more about you and your group. Can you introduce yourself and fracts? Certainly so. I am the president of the four river residents and our group is we have a fifteen member board. We have approximately sixteen hundred members in our email list, but just people all over the state and all over the community. We are a an incorporated Bible ones see four at this moment and we have grown. We started out almost seven years ago, it's crazy to me, and we have grown and grown and grown. Wow, that's amazing. And one six hundred on your email list, that's quite quite a network that you have access to. So, Alice, you mentioned your for river residents working against this compressor station. Can you tell us more about who that is and what that community looks like? Sure. So, we have three different communities in the basin and we call our else you know, the four river residents. So we encompass those three communities in Quincy and braintree and Waymouth waymouth. This effects mostly North Weymouth, but I try to tell everybody in South Weymouth did affect you to hell, but North Weymouth is most affected by it and that North Wymouth is a working class neighborhood. You know, you're not going to find rich people in North Weymouth. They are working class people that work hard, they love their coastal home and they've been kind of abused by these companies. And they're not the only ones. In Quincy we have quincy point and Germantown. Both of these environmental justice neighborhoods recognize both on the state and federal level with the new census. We have EJ neighborhoods now in north waymouth and we have Aj neighborhoods in East braintree and that's a section of brain tree that is most affected. So we're all working class people and being environmental justice being working class. Do you hear a lot...

...of folks say, Oh, you know, the politicians not going to listen to us because we don't have any money, or, you know, we can't do anything for him. I say really, you got a vote and you tell them that they work for you. This has been something that is near and dear to us because, as you know, where are you going to find these polluting facilities? You're going to finding smack DAB in the middle of neighborhoods that are considered voiceless, J working class. We don't care about you people, and that has been the historic history of the basin, the real history of the basin. So we love our neighborhood, we love our base and we want you people to clean it up. Thanks, Alice. To tell us a little bit more about your personal background and and kind of your I know you did some different kind of organizing before jumping into the issue. Can tell us a little bit about that? Yes, I actually come from the political world. I've been a political organizer for about sixteen years now and that's where things kind of got started for me. I learned a lot about organizing and about how to get the word out and get people motivated and work with community from my political organizing. And you know how did I get into Environmentalis them? Well, I'm a main girl. I'm a farm girl from northern made and environmental issues have always been near and dear to my heart. The Earth is our home and and we have to take care of it. So it's sort of a it's a it's a cross read kind of the thing. Politics and environmentalism. Yeah, they go together. And so how did you first hear about the compressor station? How did you, you know, first first hear about this threat in your community? Well, that comes from a political end too. So at the time I was the chair of the Social Democratic Caucus. There are eight towns in that caucus. We go by Senate district and one of my chairs, Doug from hull, said this email and he was in the three hundred and fifteen mass so short node, and he said Hey, alice, you know what you're doing awaymouth? No idea, Tuck, what are they doing away with the and he just sent me this sort of brief synopsis of this extended pipeline and compressor station. I have no idea what he's talking about. I am clueless gas. I don't have gas at my house. And that's how I found out about it and I researched it because Doug is, you know, he's a good source and he has good information and I looked at it went, oh Hell No. So what is the compressor station? Yeah, can you tell us, lawyer, what what the problem? So the problem. It's multiple. But the problem is that compressor stations, they are buildings or facilities that push gas along the pipelines. So in this case this is fract gas coming up from Pennsylvania and Texas and and they need these compressor stations to boost to the gas, you know, to get it, to push it through the pipelines. And so that's what that is. And then the larger problem is as part of the polluting and toxic method industry, these stations obviously admit a lot of bad things. Of course, all the chemicals that they throw into fracking actually gets offcasted at the compressor station and at all the weeks along the way. That's like the the big major sort of earth shattering problem with compressor stations. But in our location this would this is now, the I believe, the ten...

...industrial polluting project and a one mile radius in the form of the river basin and being an urban, very urban area, and they of course wanted to cite it on top of a toxic waste dump in a flood zone. Yeah, there was just a few problems with it, just a few minor issues, it sounds like. Right. Just always shocking how many bad ideas in the industry managers to pile on top of each other. So you mentioned, you know, you got this email and you looked into a little bit more. And what came next? How did you get from there into starting to organize against this? Well, I read information, I read what I could get from other organizations. There was actually a group, I think it was called Spectra busters, because back in the day en bridge, who now owns this mess, was spectra. And I looked up spectral busters and I got a hold of the guy that ran that in Pennsylvania and and started trying to learn more. And because my background is political, that's all I knew, I just said, okay, I got to tell the mayor, who have to be a friend of mine, I have to tell the district counselor, I have to tell the reps in the senator and everybody and and call the governor and say you can't do this. And so that's where I started. And just because of, you know, sort of what I know about political organizing, we got together a facebook page within you know, probably a month after their first open house, which was January, of two thousand and fifteen and we got up a facebook page, we started broadcasting on social media and we actually had our first in person meeting at the local library in March of two thousand and fifteen and thirty three people showed up, which was amazing. That's so amazing. Yeah, can you, can you tell us a little bit more about the that initial public hearing and how you got those those folks to show up to that, at that first kind of community group meeting? Well, we had put out on a we had created a facebook page for the four river residents. We started posting on the town facebook pages. You know, there's one called everything weymouth and a lot of people go on to bet and we put up notices in the local libraries, on the billboards and I was at the time, and am again or still the chair of their waymouth Democratic Town Committee. So I just let my Democrats know and said Hey, guys, just so you know, we're getting this organized. And it really was a very word of mouth kind of thing. So, like my sister in law who was in North Waymouth, she told all her neighbors right and by this time the district one counselor Becky Hall, was on board and so she told all her neighbors and you know, we had this first meeting at the the library actually across town and South Weymouth, and these thirty three people just like showed up and said this sounds like a really bad idea. Tell us more and and that was the very first meeting. And I tell a funny story. There was one woman who came up to me and she said, well, I'm really disappointed and I said, oh Um, did I not give enough information, tod what did I say? And she said, oh no, no, she said, I thought they'd be more people here. This is a really bad idea. I said I got more than five people. I said your you did this right. Thirty three people. This is amazing. Oh my goodness. Yeah, people, I think of people don't understand how hard it is to turn people out to those, especially this first initial meetings. Yes, yeah, definitely. Well, I'd love to also hear a bit more about that first public hearing and what community engagement...

...looked like, what outreach looked like. I know this is something that we see time and time again in issues like this, where the company just doesn't really make an effort to make sure that the folks who are going to be impacted can ask questions and how to say. Would love to hear what that looks like in this context and how that felt. Well, so the first public outreach that SPEC Dru now and bridge did was in January, two thousand and fifteen, and it just so happens that two days before this open house we had four feet of snow and wayness and they had sent out this notice to what is called the half mile notification zone. So they sent letters to people like my sister in law that said, you know, we're having this open house. Come learned about what a great idea this comparis situation is, and so they had done that. There were they're required to by law. And Becky Hawk, the town councilor had announced it it, you know, up town council meeting maybe a week or so before, and but people would not have had a clue what this was about at that point. So I was all in a panic, like I don't know what to do. So I went on the town website facebook pages and said Hey, guys, you know, come to this meeting. This is really important. This is scary stuff. You know, and tried to get people to come. Now, of course, after having four feet to snow, I thought, oh well, maybe they'll postpone it or something like no, of course he didn't. So about fifteen people showed up. It was like it was really creepy because they would follow you around the room. So it was like a school science fare where they had different places you could go to learn about compressors or see how beautiful they were and how wonderful this all was. Right, Oh, when they had swag to you know, like pens and statchelor's and barbecue brush is just like wacky stuff and during acute brushes, Oh my God, barbecue brushes, it's its structra on them and I have a specter pen. I use it ironically, and they so that's what what happened. And but the weird part was that one of the people that came to that meeting ended up being our criminal attorney. Wow, because as I sat and talked to him and his wife and they lived like really close to the compressor station and he said, if you guys, he says, if you get a group going and you people are crazy and you're going to protest and stuff. Said, I will represent you pro bono. That's amazing. It's always yeah, it's always great and making those connections, and that kind of builds into what I was going to ask next around how you built the group. I know you said You had thirty three folks at the first meeting. Where did things go from the there in terms of folks getting involved and how did you loop people into, you know, the roles that allowed them to contribute to building the campaign? Well, the lucky thing was was we actually had out allies on the outset in the three hundred and fifty mass so shore node and we actually and we we found this guy, this Michael Lang, who is on our board. Everywhere know it's Mike Right. He came to an open house in Quinsy like the next month and he spoke to a political friend of mine and activist who helped me that night. We would stand outside of these open houses and hand out flyers, you know, information about what a compresed station really was. And he started talking to her and I had to leave because I was running another meeting and shape texted me in the middle of my meeting and said here's a name. You got to find this guy and you know he...

...was a person who was a wealth of information and he actually told me about what what was what is now community action works, but what was toxic actions at the time. And he told me said, you got to get ahold of these people. They can help, and so we that's sort of how we started, and the lucky thing was between the three hundred and fifty connections and the first meeting in March, people who were worried and activated about this kind of showed up and said what can we do, and so we we buy April we had begun canvassing North Weymouth, North Quincy and braintree neighborhoods to alert them to the issue and at that point we learned what happened to that. We were going to have a federal energy regulatory commission scope be meeting in May and we canvassed for four weekends and dropped four thousand flyers. Wow, that's impressive. Yeah, I thought so too. And so, yeah, as you were working on putting this campaign together, how did you you know, figure out where to focus your attentions with for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, at the local level, at the state level level? Yeah, how did you decide where the focus and I want tactics to use. Well, it started, of course, that we looked at again. I looked at the political end event because that's where I knew what I knew. So I started there, but with people that came on board like Michael Lang, like Turner bled so. Who was the head of the three hundred and fifty, a social node, people that had been involved with these kinds of things? And and it was Turner. WAS IT Turner? Know there was someone in that group. It might have been conny. Somebody had a grandchild of something who lived in New Hampshire was going to be affected by the net pipeline up there, the northeast direct and there were supposed to be putting in an eighteen thousand forced power compressor like right in that person's town. So they started feeding information into us about her, about the state agencies, about how you go about these things, and they sort of adopted me and said, Oh, we're having these three hundred and fifty conference and wooster on doesn't such a week and one acamp. So I got people like Oh cady Christoffers and from plan and and it was, it was, I have to tell you, TMI like a whirlwind at the beginning, your head spinning like okay, we're are we going? But again just lucking out. We had so hard and come to one of our first meetings and so was one of the people who helped author the environmental justice still under developed Patrick and talk about a wealth of information and understanding and organizing abilities. So just people that gravitated had these mad skills and power mapping. Like okay, who do we go? and honestly, we probably had about five things that we had to go at it once. So it wasn't just the politicians. It was burke, it was the DDP, it was the conservation commission in the town of Waymouth, you know. I mean you had and you had to do it all at once. For folks who may be newer to like to organizing, what did that look like? You know, did you have a me meeting or you talked about all...

...of this that? I hear you say it's a lot of luck, and I know for my own experience it's not actually about luckets about a lot of hard work and strategizing and and talking it out with each other, and that's really true. I mean the luck is the person that might walk in the door. So, for instance, the Guy Chet Clem, who was he and Laura Boor built our website and chat again, walks in the door. The Guy has an Undergrad from Bates and environmental policy, a Grad degree from Columbia and business and it used to write for the onion. I'm like, you got to be kidding made right and the walks in the door. But these people had, you know, I talked to them, they had motivation, they had, you know, concern about climate and about waymouth and you know, all of these things and and and mad skills, which was lucky. But what we started doing this we started having these wealth, lack of a better term, I'll call them board meetings, because we didn't really have a board. It was just me and and Mike Lang tagged along and Laura boards tagged along and sew hardened tagged along and and we would have these meetings in my dining room and it started like, you know, we have a meeting once every couple of months or something, and then the meetings contain monthly and so every month the board would meet at my dining room table with food and, you know, wine and coffee or whatever you wanted, and we would have meetings. They usually lasted three to four hours. So it is Shane to thank you and it's an immense amount of work. Definitely, that is so. I mean, yeah, how having the Lucky folks walk in the room is one thing, but knowing how to connect them to each other and build on each other is is a whole different thing. And it sounds like there is a lot of work that was put into those relationships. And I know from a previous conversation we had alice, you talked about having meetings with dozens of people showing up, which can be unwieldy to have so many people wanting to chip in. How did you navigate, you know, keeping in touch with folks and having those relationships and building that trust with so many people, you know, wanting to be part of the effort? I think that well, what we did was we really took so much down to the personal level, and that requires a lot of time and and work. But we invited people in and said, you know, how could you help us? We're doing that. How can we help you? How can you help us? And gave people the opportunity to shine and to show their mad skills, no matter who they were and no matter what level they were, because we had people that walked in the door and say, I've never done anything like this before. Great, here's the sign. Both stand on that street corner. So you know, that's where the political skills come in. And when we started having monthly and we've been having monthly fracts meetings for over five years, for for six years I think at least. You know, we would meet like every couple of months and then all of a sudden it started becoming monthly because, thanks, we're getting crazy, and so the monthly meetings really really help people because we give them information and candy. We you know, we have different people that come and and speak. It's not just me Melton off all the time. It's, you know, our board members. You know, Margaret Talks about the PIP and judy talks about donating and Laura...

...talks about, you know, the EJ stuff and that you know. So it's a whole group of voices at any particular meeting. And then we would get people in like eat IPE party, who started writing articles about us for dsmog. We had him come and speak about investigative journalism. We had the bank collective come and speak about non violent civil disobedience. So we would have these special meetings to get people active and involved, but really giving people an outlet to their frustration and an outlet to the to their anger about out the situation and is really it's a big deal. It's a thing you got to do. Definitely, and you know I'm you all. You mentioned making it personal and building those connections and tying people in, and I feel like the flip side to that, when something is so personal and it's in your neighborhood, is that it can be really frustrating and you know, and in impact you personally, emotionally and and how what did that look like through this, you know, this project being pushed through different steps and fighting back? How did that? Where they're specific moments that stand out to you, is especially challenging to keep pushing through or, you know, where the frustration and the anger were especially present as a result of how that this decision making was unfolding? Yeah, so I have to say I took out a lot of my anger on Charlie, big or not that he did not deserve it. We had lots of fine going up to the statehouse and I'd stand up fine side of the office on column an idiot and have absolutely no problem saying that to his face, should he ever liked to meet with me. So you know, that's you kind of get into that and that kind of action, you know, like the big actions that would happen at this State House, and a lot of times they were collected. So it wasn't it's certainly not just about fracts and we always said that we are just part of this global nightmare. We are, you know, we're just in our little neighborhood, but we're fighting our war or our battle for the bigger war. So, you know, I would have to say, you know, in terms of like working, working through the frustration, honestly, I got to tell you, meetings help. It's in the sounds this made up, so quite appropriate, but it's like a Ya it the meanings help. They help people to voice their frustration, get people an outlet, and that clues me. And you know, I'd have to say like one of probably the most the hardest and most challenging thing that happened was when bark just said yet go ahead and build. Just did you know at that point there was this this law where people were like we lost, and I'm like yeah, just for today. I'll let you mope about that for a day and then we're going to go back because we haven't lost and we're going to keep going. I hear you that working with these folks is what brings you hope. Are there? Are there other pieces that give you that drive to keep going as a group leader? You know what? I guess I have to say this. You know, there's all obviously an internal mechanism. Either that or I'm crazy that you've got one planet, you've got one world, you've got one, you know, place to call home and if you if you just give up, if you just say, Oh, these powers are too big and they're too powerful and...

...they're too you know, whatever like that, you will give up and you'll go away and the next thing you know we'll be living in the matrix. There's no there's no other thing that you can do. And so, but I would say to anybody you do need rest. There are going to be times when you just going to have to sit down and go okay, I just can't for a moment. I need to rest, I need to think, because it is so overwhelming. It's so overwhelming when you look at the bigger picture and you know fighting. We've always said it's David and Goliath, but David one been bridge is this monster of an organization, of a corporation. They have money beyond our wildest imagination and bowyers and all of this other stuff. But look at what we've done. We have cost those bastards eighty two million dollars over there. Watch it and it's going to get worse for them because they've got five months where they have to keep digging this mess up. Yeah, so, yeah, and I know you know they've got the money power, but we've got the People Power and that there are a lot of other groups that have been a part of this effort to build your people power. Can you tell us a little bit about navigating some of these coalition dynamics and keeping the for river residents front and center in that decision making process? Yeah, so that was interesting. That was, God, somewhat new for me. In the political world you operate with different caucuses or with different towns and of course, you know, let's say you have three candidates and you're supporting candidate a, but candidate a doesn't make it out of the primary and now you and you're like, oh, can I be wasn't really my first choice, but you know what, go home like your own, suck it up and you go work for candidate be. So it helps you to give this, give to the sort of ecumenical mindset that look at we're all in this together. How can you help us and how can we help you? How can fracts work to help, say when we were dealing with the access more east and oddly end up the axis northeast, which now we know is has gone out of pre file but will be bad, and we we were able to reach out to Rohobeth and to a cushion at and to organize, you know, small organizations there to say hey, we're with you guys. And you know, let's say they had said, you know what, waymouth is too much of a pain and ass we're going to move this compressor to Rehobe. We're not going to put it in Waymouth for we're going to move it to hole brook or you know other the one of this other seven locations that they had picked out. I said we'll be there. We might be in Waymouth, but if they move it to Hobrook, we will be there. We're not letting you people off the hook. So being willing to reach out for that, for that hand for help, but also being able to reach out and say how can we help you? Getting on board with that was was really instrumental and honestly, that was the beginning of like mass power forward where all of these groups could get together and we still have weekly, your I think it's now every other week, meetings, and so the group's everyone kind of knows what everybody else is doing and having those allies and having people who who knew stuff and you know, we're able to listen to them to work with them, has been it's amazing. Guess it can be challenged because you know sometimes you're like, but wait a minute, you got to talk about US slight, but you know, it's it's all worked out great. Definitely that's amazing, having those allies in being able to have those...

...kind of reciprocal relationships to build trust and power together over time. I know you've kind of referenced a little bit over this conversation kind of things that have happened over time with the compressor station. Can you give us a quick update on where things stand now? What is the latest status and what are you looking at in terms of next steps. So we just completed a couple of weeks ago we were in court in Federal Court for the air quality permit. We're asking the court to remand the permit back to the DDP because they refused to even look at an electric motor depth drive as opposed to a gas turbine engine and the electric motor drive. As much as we don't want the compressor right and we're forcing them to do everything we can to put them out of operation, if they have the electric motor drive it would cut the emissions by fifty percent. Wow, and they were just to clarify their alice. You're saying you're going Federal Court tight have them remanded it to the states divided department of Environmental Protection here in Massachusetts. Yes, that's correct. Sorry, I mean yeah, to clarify that yet to remand it back to the state where the state has to look for this electric motor drives. That's one of like the little pieces that's going on. But on the broader scenario they are going to be spending, I'm guesstimating, somewhere between ten and fifteen million dollars of the past next five months. They started in August. They have to dig up the entire site again, they have to put in safety equipment that they should have put in wow they were constructing, and so this is costing them even more money and causing even more and by environmental damage, because so digging into that toxic soil again. So that's what sort of happening on the ground and to them financially. But for us we still have multiple court cases and we are moving forward to try to stop them from operating. They did not ever need that compressor station. They did not ever need it for the Atlantic Bridge. And just for folks who who maybe don't know about the the latest the compressor station has been built and has been functional at times, though has had now for incidents alice in a matter of monster. What's the what's the breakdown? There? Six six now about it's just keeps going up, egg keeps going up, you know, and some of them are you know, they're going to Pooh pull it right and say, Oh, these are just a little little things, little things, right. But pipeline and has yours material safety administration actually shut them down a year ago and they shut them down because from the from right out of the gate, they weren't even operating and they had two accidents back to back and so FIMSA, as we call them, came in and said, okay, we're shutting you down. You've got to figure out what the heck is going on here. And so the quote, they figured it out, quote unquote, and then proceeded to have more accidents. And whether you call them unintentional blowdowns or you call them accidents, I don't really care. You can call them but banana for all I care. You are putting all these talksins into the air. That's what I care about. So, yeah, that's where that's at. Thanks. We know this story is a local touchstone for something bigger that's happening across the region that our grid operator is is so new England is keeping US hooked on fossil fuels. Can you share more about how that has been factored into the campaign? Yes, so one of our board members, frank, is our expert on the ISS o New England as well the sea level rise, but he has...

...kept us sort of in touch with the ISSO and what they're doing in terms of going for the gas and that, you know what, it's not going to get any better. Now share all the floor is the Mucky muck there at the ISSO and she was not our friend at Park and so I don't. I do not have a lot of faith in the Isoson New England and but right now, and this is what people need to understand in it and again, this is got to be a campaign we're going to run here. On my phone I'm notified from the ISOS New England every time we go over fifty mega what hour. My phone is going off fifteen, sixteen times a day. Now my personal energy use is the sayings. That was last year, but my bill is thirty percent higher and that's because of the gas and the gas pipelines that they are now heart attacking on these enormous charges. The gas, which is worthless, is now being priced out of the market. And this is all manipulant, manipulation, it's all false and this is what the Isao is allowing. So my big thing, and Catholic Christotison calls me a communist, is to say we need to break up the utilities and we need to break this up and make it local. Definitely need to move towards a more distracted energy system, for sure. And just to clarify something that you mentioned, Alice, that Sheryl Leffler is now the chair of the board of directors I at iasaw, New England, and was formerly a commissioner at firk and so that just happened in the last few days and here at the end of September. So we'll see what kind of impacts that has going forward on I a. So a last question for you, Alice. You have now been working on this for the better part of a decade. Did you did you expect that when you were getting into this, when you got involved and now, looking back, what would you tell yourself at the beginning that you either something you know now that you didn't then, or you know a different way you would have approached this, or or anything else along those lines? I have to tell you that the first time I had conected with Mike Lang Hey what me straight the eyes said, do you have any idea what you're getting yourself into? I said no, I have no idea. He says, you're going to give up ten years of your life. He said, I'm just telling you that right now, if you go for this, that's what's going to happen. So in a way I was warned. I'm not sure I believed him at the time. So yeah, some things I would have said to myself run, move, get out, go now, but it wouldn't matter because it doesn't matter. Today it's in Waymouth, tomorrow's in your neighborhood. It and it us a't just affect playmouth, it affects all of us planet wide. And so would I change what I did? Likely not. Are there things that we might have done better? Always I can't like, I can't put my finger on like wonder two. Everything is they always should have done that. I think, well, maybe, maybe, this one thing we could have done better, that maybe we will try to do. And we've hesitated to be too political, even though we are five, a one, see four. But we really needed to go after Governor Baker even worse than we did, because he is like the tefl on dawn and no matter what he does, it just rolls right off them.

I don't understand it. I've never been able to figure that out. And you know what, he's responsible for this mess. He's responsible for us, he's responsible for Charlton, he's Boston, sands field, all of it. He is one hundred percent the author of this nightmare and I wish we had gone after him even worse. Thanks for sharing that, Alison. Thank you for putting so many years into this and keeping up the fight. And you know there's there's a lot of head for sure at before we wrap up. Is there anything else that you would like to add that you haven't been able to touch on yet? Well, I would like to ask people to get involved. Get involved and if it's not fracture, getting involved with but there's a local fight in your neighborhood, whether it's about water or air or soil or energy, get involved. Just get involved. I would say that. And then I would also say get involved with US anyway. You can see us on facebook, the poor river residents against the compressor station. We have a website, really easy, no compressorcom and go to the news dropdown there's our history. Seven years almost there. And and if you want to get in touch with us, send us an email that no compressor at gmailcom. We always are willing to put a hand out and let people help. We want to say a huge thank you to alice arena for coming on and sharing her story with us. To support the fracts campaign, check out the links in the show notes. Thank you, all for tuning in today. Join US again next time to hear from Ian McDonald about a power plant fight and killing lie Connecticut. And if you haven't yet, be sure to subscribe to this podcast on whichever podcast platform you use so that you won't miss new episodes as they get posted. Share this episode and write us a review to help others find us. To to learn more about community action works, check out our website and social media and again, all of these links are in the show notes. Thanks for listening and talk with you next week. Stories from the front lines is brought to you by community action works. It is recorded by me near a pe Johnny, with support from Shana Casper, edited and produced by Lilly mclachlin. Special thanks to Theo Rosen for research and development, to Gage Calhoun for supporting this project through her fundraising work and to Aaron Matthew for composing and recording the original music. We wouldn't be able to make this happen without the incredible work of the movement and the support of the community action works team, especially Ruthy rickenbacker. Our campaigns are made possible through our do paying members, donors and funders, but really through the hard and tireless work of our community leaders, who've been fighting pollution and stating solutions across the region since one thousand and seven. Thank you.

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